Giving Tuesday 2018

A charity that helps people transform their lives through media is kicking off its first ever Giving Tuesday with 24 hours of live radio broadcasting.

Station House Media Unit (shmu), a charity based in Aberdeen, will be using the platform to shout about its programmes, engage with local charities and businesses, and raise awareness for a major fundraising campaign.

Fundraising Officer Frieda Strachan said:

“We are viewing this as a fantastic opportunity to talk about the wide range of activities and opportunities shmu provides. Most people think that it is ‘just a radio station’, but the organisation delivers so much more.”

It is the first year that the charity, which supports disadvantaged and vulnerable people and communities in the North East of Scotland, is taking part in the campaign, through its own community radio station, shmuFM.

Frieda continued:

“Our organisation is one of the highest performing employability providers in the North East; it runs a community media unit in the region’s prison and supports the reintegration of participants back into the community; it supports one of the largest youth work programmes in Aberdeen; it supports over 250 volunteers to actively engage in giving back towards the regeneration areas of Aberdeen through the production of community media – radio, magazines and TV.”

Led by its volunteers, the organisation will be running 24 hours of live radio broadcasting – sharing stories of how their communities have been impacted by the charity and its volunteers, and will also be inviting charities from across the city to come and talk about the importance of giving back and Giving Tuesday.

The charity is in the middle of its own campaign, ‘Paving the Way to Woodside’, to raise funds new for a £1.5m redevelopment of its base in Woodside, Aberdeen – including two new radio studios and a TV studio, a new training suite and new offices.

Speaking about the upcoming marathon, Alan, one of the volunteers, said he sees Giving Tuesday as a chance to give something back to shmu for their support.

Sharing his story, he said: “Five years ago I was diagnosed with bipolar disorder after suffering a mental breakdown. Being told that I would probably never work again was devastating, and shmuFM was my saviour.”

He added:

“When the need to raise money for the building was mentioned, and the idea of a marathon broadcast first suggested, I saw it as a way of repaying shmu for the thousands of hours of fun, information and education that I’ve had the honour of broadcasting, along with the unconditional care and support shown to me and the other volunteers. Please pledge some money for this organisation that means so much not just to me, but the hundreds of other people that shmu helps get through their life.”

Frieda added: “The Radio Marathon will give people in the city an opportunity to speak directly to our volunteers on-air about the impact their donation will have. It’s a unique opportunity for people to share their experiences with those helping to support the organisation.”